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This weekend was the first annual 'Sculpture Splash - An Art Extravaganza by the Sea'. Many talented artists from around Vancouver Island and members of the Vancouver Island Sculptors Guild brought their sculptures to be displayed in the breathtaking Macaulay Point Park in Esquimalt, BC. I was thrilled to be included in this spectacular event. Below Daniel Cline's beautiful piece are photos of my sculptures that I displayed; as well, I have posted more pictures from the event on the Azara Effect facebook page

Sculpture Splash

'Eternal Flame Ocean Wave' by Daniel Cline

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Scott Gillies sculpture

Ignis (latin for fire) by Scott Gillies
Granite
40 cm x 18 cm 18 cm
Granite is a type of rock that is found all over the earth as it is formed deep in the fiery cauldron of the earth’s mantle then brought to the surface as lava.  Being a member of the Igneous family (Igneous from the latin Ignis for fire) means that it is derived from the melting of preexisting stone. In a sense the stone was given a new life in this molten crucible.   It is this transformation and rebirth that inspired my forms in this carving.

 

Scott Gillies sculpture

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Scott Gillies sculpture

EXIN C̸ENS ŚĆSE LÁ,E    (Where do you live, where are you from?)

by Scott Gillies

Driftwood
130 cm x 40 cm x 40cm


We would like to gratefully acknowledge that we are on the lands of the Lekwungen People.
The piece of driftwood came from somewhere – some place where the tree reached for the sun while being grounded in the soil from which it fed. The tree was just one part of a forest community, rich and diverse with life. This sculpture is an exploration of its journey from that forest to the beaches of the Esquimalt lagoon. Was this tree, like many of us, an immigrant who has made (claimed?) this land our home, or a ‘Magna Carta Tree,’ toppled for industrious use, or perhaps a humble giant who fell, and slid into a watery slumber? The rough waters and rocks have changed its once earthy hues and impressive size, but the tree maintains its mighty presence. The finished piece is a juxtaposition of smooth and rough, of journeys beginning and ending, and of a sense of belonging – but not belonging.

 

Scott Gillies sculpture

Scott Gillies sculpture